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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 14, 2024 9:00am-9:31am GMT

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despite an increase in the energy price cap. hello, i'm lauren taylor. we start this hour in indonesia where polls have closed in what's billed as the largest and most complex one day election in the world. more than 200 million people were eligible to vote in the world's third—largest democracy. the vote took place in the country's 17,000 islands, across three time zones. the front runner, defence minister prabowo subianto, is hoping to win the presidential vote outright, to avoid a second round. the former general is up against two former provincial governors in the contest to replace the popular outgoing presidentjokowi. let's speak to our south east asia correspondentjonathan head, who's injakarta for us. it has been an
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it has been an enormous it has been an enormous logistical it has been an enormous logistical challenge, if nothing else. absolutely. this polling station behind me is very accessible, just one of 820,000 polling stations across the country that spans the space of the continental united states, thousands of islands. they have done it before and they do it very well. there has been aided of a problem with the weather, a massive thunderstorm, the debtor —— but as far as we can tell, the vote has gone well, turnout is pretty good. behind me, there are observers watching the officials, as they go through the count. they had in the president and they are doing the vice president now. they also have other votes for regional parliament has well. there are huge numbers of candidates they have to go through. it is a big job they are getting it done and they expect to have a fairly definitive result reallyjust by the end of the day, within a few hours. polls that have been conducted as people finished voting,
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exit polls, are suggesting that prabowo subianto, the frontrunner, the defence minister, is doing very well. he has a commanding lead and it looks as though he is going to get more of the 50% stanley 50% threshold required to win outright at this stage. for his supporters, thatis at this stage. for his supporters, that is good to be a great achievement. this is a man who has been aiming for the presidency for many years. he tried twice in previous elections. he is 72 now. a final achievement for him. but he is very controversial. as a human right to record that is much criticised. and the most controversial aspect of him is that he got the support of presidentjokowi, he remains very popular and switched sides at the last minute, he has his son in as the running mate through a very controversial court decision. there has been a lot of dispute and argument about the way the incumbent and the frontrunner have come together to build this commanding lead but as things stand, this looks
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like the outcome to this election. in terms of the challenges for whoever wins, what would you say the main ones are?— main ones are? whoever takes over is buildin: on main ones are? whoever takes over is building on quite _ main ones are? whoever takes over is building on quite an _ main ones are? whoever takes over is building on quite an impressive - building on quite an impressive legacy. presidentjokowi brought a measure of calm, he is a very conservatory figure, has a great popular touch and comes from humble roots himself, very much widely liked and he brought in a lot of the... normally it is very fractious, huge numbers of ethnic and religious groups, he brought a lot of people into his big tent government to get consensus around his development project, his infrastructure projects, which most people think been very good. it is continuing his legacy which really all three candidates have been committing to do with some variations, that is going to be considered the right course for indonesia. there are still continued problems about raising people out of
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poverty. there is concern about the indebtedness of state companies. the biggest concern is if prabowo subianto wins, he is such a firebrand controversialfigure, what firebrand controversial figure, what kind firebrand controversialfigure, what kind of president is he going to be and in particular, what is he going to do to democracy? a lot of his pronouncements are very anti—democratic. that is where a lot of the concerns lie. anti-democratic. that is where a lot of the concerns lie.— of the concerns lie. thank you very much indeed- _ to the middle east... palestinians are saying the israelis are ten people to evacuate a hospital and a crowd of people apparently leaving the compound in the city of khan yunis. the idf has not yet responded. it is not clear if the order is directed only to the displaced people who had taken refuge there whether they include patients and medical staff. as with
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soon as we get details at the hospital in gaza, we will bring that to you. a top un official has warned an israeli assault on rafah, gaza's southernmost city, could lead to a "slaughter". over a million palestinians are crammed into rafah. a un spokesman told the bbc, the united nations would not participate in any forced evacuation, and had not seen any israeli evacuation plans. rafah has come under heavy israeli air strikes in recent days, with at least 67 people killed there on monday according to gaza's health ministry. humanitarian chief martin griffiths said palestinians in gaza were suffering an "assault that is unparalleled in its intensity, brutality and scope". a day of negotiations in cairo on a new ceasefire deal between israel and hamas has ended without a breakthrough. live now to our correspondent, barbara plett usher, injersualem. i don't know if you have any more information about the reports we are getting about the evacuation of the hospital.
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getting about the evacuation of the hosital. , , , ., , getting about the evacuation of the hosital. , , ., , ., hospital. yes, the hospital is one ofthe hospital. yes, the hospital is one of the few _ hospital. yes, the hospital is one of the few functioning _ hospital. yes, the hospital is one of the few functioning hospitals l of the few functioning hospitals left in gaza and it has been under siege for many weeks because it is in khan yunis, the focus of the israeli military operation. they said that's where hamas has its command structure and its leadership. but the hospital has been surrounded by tanks, the palestinians are there, the doctors have for a while reported sniper fire that has killed a number of people in the compound. and the conditions had been deteriorating significantly. supplies are running out. there is sewage on the floors. there is not enough food. we have been watching out for a while and what we understand now based on reports from the doctors inside the hospital and also from some of the socially —— social media images, it seems the israelis have made an evacuation order for people to leave. it is not clear if that applies just to the displaced people who have been living there because
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people have traditionally in this conflict anyway gone to hospitals because they thought they would be safe places, so there are displaced people living there, or if it means the patients and the doctors are also meant to leave. they have been mixed messages about that and there are people in quite a serious medical condition there that would be difficult to move. it is a moving situation at the moment but it comes after weeks of pressure on this hospital. at the israelis say is that dog that uses civilian infrastructure including hospitals as a cover for its operations, although that is something that medical officials deny. in although that is something that medical officials deny.- medical officials deny. in the meantime. _ medical officials deny. in the meantime, there _ medical officials deny. in the meantime, there appears . medical officials deny. in the meantime, there appears to | medical officials deny. in the i meantime, there appears to be medical officials deny. in the - meantime, there appears to be no progress in those talks in cairo. there was not a breakthrough. there was a very senior level discussion yesterday, on tuesday, trying to move that proposal along, it is a draft framework that has been around for some weeks. hamas made some
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amendments to it, which israel strongly rejected. they were not able to close and pretty wide gaps but the egyptians and the americans say things are moving in the right direction. what we understand from some reporters that a big sticking point is the ratio of how many palestinian prisoners would be freed for the release of israeli hostages but talks to continue at a lower level and there is a lot of political pressure behind it from the americans, especially, president biden had said clearly he wants this six week pause in the fighting in order to get the hostages released but also to get a period of calm so that they can get more aid into gaza and so they will keep trying because the political pressure is there. tell is about the political situation in israel itself. how strong is the government at the moment? it strong is the government at the moment? , ., , ., moment? it is a unity government based on the _ moment? it is a unity government based on the fact _ moment? it is a unity government based on the fact that _ moment? it is a unity government based on the fact that there - moment? it is a unity government
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based on the fact that there has i based on the fact that there has been this crisis in israel, so you have a coalition that is running the country, made up of the prime minister's party but also two very right—wing constituents, who have been pushing for a pretty heavy—handed the war and have been saying that if there is a pause in the war, then they might pull out, so that is something the prime minister is very mindful of. there is also a war cabinet that has brought on other officials from the military, retired military, and you have different views there in terms of how israel should proceed. i think the general view is that they do need to keep going after hamas and defeated, or at least cripple military capability, but there is a lot of criticism of the prime minister and that... the israeli people, once the war has ended, once the israeli hostages are back, they will want to have an election
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because they have blamed him for him —— his policies for the crisis. he isjuggling all that and —— his policies for the crisis. he is juggling all that and that is what you hear some of the very tough rhetoric coming from him at this point. rhetoric coming from him at this oint. ., ~' ,, , . with me is chris gunness, former unwra spokesperson. thanks for coming to talk to us. you know the area well, we have had an unusual strong warning for the risks. ., ., unusual strong warning for the risks. . . . , unusual strong warning for the risks. . . , ., unusual strong warning for the risks. rafah has become a symbol of man a art risks. rafah has become a symbol of man apart of — risks. rafah has become a symbol of man apart of the _ risks. rafah has become a symbol of man apart of the s _ risks. rafah has become a symbol of man apart of the 5 human _ risks. rafah has become a symbol of man apart of the 5 human -- - man apart of the s human —— inhumanity to man. there are 1.5 million people and rising living in the open—air, they don't have access to sanitation, toilets, water, food, medicine. what we are seeing is what. .. medicine. what we are seeing is what... we have seen the climax if you like of this, what martin
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called, and unprecedented barbaric assault. president biden needs to stop talking about benjamin netanyahu going over the top, we need to see a massive humanitarian mobilisation. the protection of palestinians are no longer be in israeli hands. if the us can get warships to the area, they can get them for him on at aryan purposes. president 0bama signed an executive order in 2010. 20,000 service personnel were mobilised. that is the kind of humanitarian response we need because the safe area in inverted commas that israel has designated is six square miles, which is not enough for 1.5 million people, even to stand up in. in amongst all this, unwra has been facing accusations that some staff couuded facing accusations that some staff colluded with hamas in the october the 7th attacks. they may have
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knowingly let hamas build a data centre underneath the gaza headquarters. that has led to funding being suspended. might it speu funding being suspended. might it spell the end of unwra? i think it is undoubtedly _ spell the end of unwra? i think it is undoubtedly facing _ spell the end of unwra? i think it is undoubtedly facing an _ spell the end of unwra? | think it| is undoubtedly facing an existential crisis. to be clear, what we're seeing israeli news management and i have been on the other end of it. here we are with the world top supreme court discussing genocide, as israel is accused of conducting, and these allegations are coming out as our discussion is going on in the hague. we know from the ap correspondent that one small part of this tunnel went under the unwra headquarters, this begins to feel like the hospital where we saw the video that was likely end of a james bond movie and in the end it was nothing like that. bbc verify itself made very good report which showed
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there was his —— israeli manipulation of the evidence and i feel we are seeing more of the same. unwra has suspended 12 people as part of the investigation. at the moment, the israelis want unwra to be disbanded. that is what they are calling for. the funding has been cut back quite drastically. tell us about about how it operates. people think it is an aid injury —— agency but it is all sorts of things we should not buy into the guilty narrative. , should not buy into the guilty narrative-— narrative. there must be no presumption _ narrative. there must be no presumption of _ narrative. there must be no presumption of guilt. - narrative. there must be no i presumption of guilt. although narrative. there must be no - presumption of guilt. although the new york times splashed this story across its pages, sky news, the financial news, channel 4 has made it very clear that there is no evidence in this dossier. as far as what unwra does in gaza itself it has 13,000 staff who are the most important —— appalling situation, risking their lives in the 156 unwra staff at the latest count had been killed and there are sadly probably more underneath the rubble. before
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the war, there was a full distribution list and that has undoubtedly swelled. i see this donor cut as illegal, a violation of international law. as a direct result of that, it is likely that thousands, hundreds of thousands of people will starve. starvation is a massacre in slow motion. and what these donors have done is fired the starting gun on the slow motion massacre. let's make no mistake, thatis massacre. let's make no mistake, that is the significance of what this donor defined means. thank you very much- — very much. i think we want to bring you some breaking news about indonesia. we are getting... the defensiveness that has a strong lead according to preliminary results. —— defensive minister.
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north korea has hacked into the personal emails of a member of the south korean president s team. the hack happened in the run up to president yoon s state visit to britain last november. north korea s hacking abilities have become increasingly sophisticated, and this is thought to be the first time it has successfully hacked an official working in the president s office. here's our correspondent, jean mackenzie. sorry, we have a report. this hack was first reported by a newspaper here in south korea this morning which said it had the information from high—level government source. this source had told them that a member of the president's team at had their e—mails hacked just before president yoon went on the state visit to the uk in november of last year, where he met king charles and queen camilla and met the british prime minister rishi sunak. this source claimed that not only were the details of mr yoon's itinerary leaked but also e—mails from the president himself. we've spoken to the presidential office about this today and they've confirmed to us that,
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yes, this hack took place but they would not disclose what information was accessed in the hack. they were very keen to point out to us that this did not mean that their security systems had been breached. they said this was down to one of their employee's careless actions because this employee in question had been using their personal e—mails to conduct work business — so, to plan some of this trip. we know north korea is increasingly using cyber hacking and its methods are becoming more becoming more and more sophisticated. it tends to have a two reasons to hack — the first is to steal money so that it can earn money for the regime, because north korea is under very strict international sanctions which mean it can't earn money in conventional ways, so it still sometimes large sums of money, recently cryptocurrency, and it's thought that some of this goes towards the state's nuclear weapons programme. the other reason that it hacks is to steal state secrets, so like this hack that we saw today,
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and the ultimate goal of is that it is thought to be to get access to sensitive weapons technology that it can use to advance its nuclear weapons programme. around the world and across the uk. this is bbc news. let's look at some other stories making news here in the uk... more than 100 families looking after severely disabled adults and children outside hospital have told the bbc that the nhs is failing to provide enough vital support. the health service says help is based on individual needs and guidelines ensure consistency across england and wales. however, some families describe the system as adversarial. ultra—processed foods should be clearly labelled, experts say. scientists said the warnings were needed as some ultra—processed foods could fall into the healthy, green category of the traffic—light system and some may be unaware that what they were buying was ultra—processed. these types of foods have been linked to obesity and heart disease.
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labour has suspended a second parliamentary candidate over comments he allegedly made about israel. graham jones, the former labour mp for hyndburn, is also facing an investigation, the bbc understands. it comes after labour withdrew support for the party's candidate for the rochdale by—election, azhar ali, for apparently making anti—semitic remarks. you're live with bbc news. to the uk now, where figuresjust out show inflation remained unchanged last month, despite an increase in the energy price cap. the office for national statistics said the rate at which prices were rising was four percent injanuary, exactly the same as in december. forecasters had expected a slight rise to 4.2%. the biggest upward factor was rising gas and electricity costs, the biggest downward factor was furniture and food. tell us about the reaction to this
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news. tell us about the reaction to this news, . ., ., . , tell us about the reaction to this news. _, ., . , ., tell us about the reaction to this news. a, ., . , ., news. economic figures and the way we read them _ news. economic figures and the way we read them are _ news. economic figures and the way we read them are often _ news. economic figures and the way we read them are often about - news. economic figures and the way we read them are often about the i we read them are often about the expectation versus the reality. you mentioned the expectation, the concern was that there might be a second bump in the road, if you like, towards lower inflation because it tipped up in december and the fear was it had done so in january. instead, prices rose by 4% in january, january. instead, prices rose by 4% injanuary, the same as a month earlier. the expectation is bad and the reality is slightly better than that. if it had not been for an increase in household gas and electricity bills, the headline inflation rate may well have fallen. there was also good news for people struggling with the weekly food shop. prices fell between december and january and that is the first monthly fall we have seen in the uk forfood prices in more than two years. however dig into the details and there are causes for concern. call inflation, when you strip out
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the volatile energy and food price movements, and services inflation, thatis movements, and services inflation, that is essentially price rises or services offered by businesses, that was either sticky or it went up slightly. those data are closely watched by the bank of england when they make their decisions on the interest rate. it is important we see the chancellor this morning saying inflation does not fall in a straight line, these figures today he says the battle is difficult but it is being won. that is certainly the message. it'll be interesting to see tomorrow if get some even more important data figures, if you like, about the gdp, economic growth in the uk, there is a concern that we fell back into recession in december. the government may have survived today's bit of data but tomorrow might be slightly more difficult. ana desmond is a senior economist at ulster university economic policy centre. shejoins me now. you have been looking at the
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details, what factorsjump you have been looking at the details, what factors jump out at you with staying the same? i details, what factorsjump out at you with staying the same? i think it is uuite you with staying the same? i think it is quite remarkable _ you with staying the same? i think it is quite remarkable again - you with staying the same? i think it is quite remarkable again that i you with staying the same? i think| it is quite remarkable again that we have seen this slightly lower—than—expected inflation rate. it has come down significantly since what we experienced last year, which is welcome for both businesses and individuals and again, markets are expecting this to further fall to in and around the target rate of 2% later this year. again, some positive news for people across the uk today. positive news for people across the uk toda . ~ ., ., i. positive news for people across the uktoda. ., ,. uk today. what do you expect the effect to be _ uk today. what do you expect the effect to be on — uk today. what do you expect the effect to be on interest _ uk today. what do you expect the effect to be on interest rates - effect to be on interest rates question mark it is a difficult one to say. question mark it is a difficult one to sa . ~ ., ~ question mark it is a difficult one tosa .~ . ~ question mark it is a difficult one tosa. m to say. we talked about the impact on core services, _ to say. we talked about the impact on core services, that _ to say. we talked about the impact on core services, that will- to say. we talked about the impact on core services, that will give - to say. we talked about the impact on core services, that will give the| on core services, that will give the bank of rent because for concern as regards cutting interest rates to soon. but tomorrow, the gdp figures might put more pressure on the bank but expectations at the moment are that rates will remain unchanged for
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the next couple of months before a cat later may be towards the summer and especially towards the end of the year. and especially towards the end of the ear. ., and especially towards the end of the ear. . . ., the year. overall, the infection rate have _ the year. overall, the infection rate have come _ the year. overall, the infection rate have come down - the year. overall, the infection rate have come down since - the year. overall, the infection| rate have come down since last the year. overall, the infection - rate have come down since last year but people are still feeling it. what are the main effects people have on their spending power? prices are still going up, inflation has come down but prices are still rising. come down but prices are still risinu. , , . ,., , come down but prices are still risin. , , . , , rising. yes, prices are still rising b 'ust at rising. yes, prices are still rising byjust at a _ rising. yes, prices are still rising byjust at a slower— rising. yes, prices are still rising by just at a slower rate - rising. yes, prices are still rising by just at a slower rate that - rising. yes, prices are still rising | by just at a slower rate that what we previously experienced over the last year. we had some positive news in that we had strong wage growth in the uk, actually slightly stronger than the eurozone and across in the united states but that is not to say that people will not have been feeling the pinch throughout 2020, 2021 and 2022. people will have gone through a difficult time. this is allowing people to rebuild their finances a little bit. but the wage growth will be welcomed that baby —— but maybe not stopping the financial pressure that people have been facing overly large number of months and years. in facing overly large number of months and ears. , ., ., , .,
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and years. in terms of how things go forward, it and years. in terms of how things go forward. it is— and years. in terms of how things go forward, it is an _ and years. in terms of how things go forward, it is an election _ and years. in terms of how things go forward, it is an election year, - and years. in terms of how things go forward, it is an election year, the i forward, it is an election year, the gunmen are watching these figures closely, what surprises might there be in the next few months —— the government? be in the next few months -- the government?— be in the next few months -- the covernment? , ., _, , ., , government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, — government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, one _ government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, one of— government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, one of his _ government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, one of his pledges - government? yes, a couple of things, rishi sunak, one of his pledges was i rishi sunak, one of his pledges was to halve inflation by the end of last year, that was delivered. again, both politics and the bank of england will be closely watching the inflation rates, but for the gdp figures coming out tomorrow, again linking back to one of the promises to grow the economy, we have been talking about the potential for a technical recession so again that is something that will be on the outlook and horizon coming into an election year, the prospect of economic growth over the next couple of months, balanced with inflationary pressures and interest—rate figures. 20 to look out for over the coming months. thank you very much indeed to look out for. —— plenty to look out for.
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ryan gosling, america ferrera and kate mckinnon have reprised their barbie roles to help 0scars hostjimmy kimmel find his way to the ceremony. the talk show host, who will host the oscars for the fourth time nest month, pays a visit to mckinnon's weird barbie in a promotional video for the ceremony. ryan gosling, as ken, appears in the back seat of the barbie car to poke fun at the trend of stars getting burgers a certain fast food chain after awards shows. whilst ferrera, reprising her role as gloria, echosing her famous monologue. take a look. never show off, never fall down, never fail, never show fear. nobody says thank you and everyone has something critical to say online. if it goes well, no—one says anything but if it doesn't, it's yourfault. yes, that's exactly...! i think what you're saying is hosting the oscars is even harder than being a woman. no. no, that's not at all what i was saying. and the oscars are on sunday
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the 10th of march. stay with us here on bbc news. quick reminder of our breaking news, the initial preliminary results from the initial preliminary results from the indonesian election suggest the defence minister has a strong leading those elections. stay with us for more on that and the rest of the news. for many of us today, it is going to be cloudy and we will have a rein on and off. at the north of scotland seeing something slightly different. we have clearer skies and fresher conditions. forthe we have clearer skies and fresher conditions. for the rest of the uk, we have these weather fronts moving from the south northwards and eastwards. in between them, we will see some brightness developing
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across north wales, the midlands, into east anglia. you can also see where we have the clear skies and here we are looking at temperatures between six and 8 degrees. much milderfor northern between six and 8 degrees. much milder for northern ireland, between six and 8 degrees. much milderfor northern ireland, the rest of england and also wales. well into double figures, 1a, 15 at best. this evening and overnight, the rain continues to push northwards, taking all this cloud with it. some of that will be heavy and persistent across northern england and scotland and it is going to be quite a mild night. the mild air pushing further north. this morning in aberdeenshire, it was minus four. tomorrow, it'll be plus five. tomorrow, the fronts moving north, all the mild air coming up on the continent, before later this weather front comes in, bringing more rain. anotherfairly cloudy day. the rain continuing to push northwards across scotland and we have a second front coming in later bringing in some rain as well. ahead of this and behind it, some brighter skies was up tomorrow,
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across eastern england, east anglia,, it could hit 16, 17 degrees. as we move into friday, the weather front bringing the rain eventually pushes away. the wind changes direction and temperatures will dip a little bit but it's changes direction and temperatures will dip a little bit but its will still be mild. a fair bit of cloud left in its wake. again, one or two showers here and there but equally, some bright weather. temperatures instead of being 16, 17, will peak at about 1k degrees. you can see across scotland and into northern ireland, still looking at eight to 12 degrees. 0n ireland, still looking at eight to 12 degrees. on saturday, another fairly cloudy day for most of us. some brighter breaks developing. later on, we will see another weather fronts weeping in to the west, bringing in some rain. and strengthening winds as well. temperatures between six and 1a.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: votes are being counted after the world's largest and most complex one—day election, as indonesians decide who will be their new president. a leading un humanitarian official warns that an israeli military assault in the southern gazan city of rafah, where over a million palestinians are residing, could lead to slaughter. protesting indian farmers clash with the police after resuming their march towards the capital delhi.
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it was a toad, iris. i think it was a frog. no, it was definitely a toad. no, that was a frog. that was definitely a toad. that's a frog. no, that was definitely a toad. and coming up, toad orfrog? we find out why roads are being closed to help them. protesting indian farmers have clashed with the police after resuming their march towards the capital delhi. there were scenes of chaos at the shambhu border, between the northern states of punjab and haryana, where the farmers were stopped on tuesday. the farmers are demanding minimum guaranteed prices for a range of crops, debt relief and a withdrawal of cases registered against some of them during previous agitation. let's speak to our correspondent nitin srivastava, who's in delhi for us. at no sense of anything coming down in this dispute, are there? the situation is _ in this dispute, are there? iia: situation is getting in this dispute, are there? "iia: situation is getting more in this dispute, are there? i““i2 situation is getting more and
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in this dispute, are there? ii2 situation is getting more and more serious and reminding

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